Thursday, February 26, 2015

SCHOLARSHIPS, CHAMPAGNE MUSIC, THE KIKO THING, and THE DAY JP2 WAS SHOT

At Loyola Marymount University back in the late 70's, I applied for and received a scholarship to study music. 

The school itself did not pay for my education, it only administered the scholarship. The actual funding came from Lawrence Welk, a Catholic, a friend of the University, and a then-famous Hollywood music personality.

Upon receiving the scholarship, Mr. Welk wrote me a congratulatory note and invited me to his home in nearby Pacific Palisades. 

I grew up watching the Lawrence Welk show every Saturday night on a black and white TV with my family. It's kind of fun to remember that.


We had a strict TV schedule: The Red Skelton Show on Tuesday nights, Daniel Boone on Thursdays, Rango (with Tim Conway) on Fridays, Lawrence Welk on Saturdays, and The Wonderful World of Disney on Sundays. And then it was bed time.

Forgive my taking license to reminisce. All this talk of scholarships caused me to slip into a bit of nostalgia. 

But down to business. I was awarded that Lawrence Welk scholarship to study music. And as long as I studied music and maintained a certain attendance, GPA, and performance record, I continued to have my tuition paid by Lawrence Welk. 

Had I quit the music program, or did not meet the expectations of the scholarship, the funding would have been withdrawn. And if I wanted to continue at LMU I would have had to find another way to pay my tuition. It wouldn't have mattered if I had quit the music program to go live and study with the campus Jesuits, Lawrence Welk simply would not have paid for me to do that. 

Would Lawrence Welk have wanted me to be a priest? I 'm sure if I wrote him and advised him of my intentions to quit the music program and join the Jesuits and asked him for financial assistance, he may very well have agreed to support me (though I'm sure the Jesuits wouldn't have taken me anyway.) :-)

In the case of the former FD student turned RMS seminarian, it appears that the young man simply defaulted on the condition of his scholarship. I am told that over the years, it was not uncommon for private persons to personally finance the education of someone they consider promising. I also understand that there is an alumni foundation which may also do this. 

Private persons and the alumni foundation may act in consort with the school or they may act independently. In fact, an individual could have his tuition paid by a benefactor and the school wouldn't necessarily have to know about it. 

Whatever the case was, the person in question defaulted on the obligation that was the condition of his scholarship and the scholarship was withdrawn. 

At that point, it was his responsibility to see to it that his tuition continued to be paid if he wished to continue at the school. However, according to reports from the people who are intimate with the details of this case, he did not. He continued to attend FD without paying his tuition. 

As with any student who falls in arrears, we can assume that the school took action to arrange for payment. But according to the report I received, no payment was made. 

Ordinarily, this would have meant a dismissal from the school. But he was not dismissed. He was permitted to continue and to graduate. 

Here is where we must ask why? 

Why was he permitted to continue without paying tuition and to graduate? It's easy to see. We simply have to ask what made this person's situation different from the others? There is only one answer. He had entered the Redemptoris Mater Seminary and thus (probably at the order of Pius - since he orders everything) had the special protection of Archbishop Apuron. 

According to the report I received, every effort was made by the school to collect the tuition, and further efforts were made by those who had something directly to do with the granting of the scholarship. However, at some point, the word either came down to "leave him alone", or those who were trying to collect had otherwise gotten "the message". 

Ultimately, Archbishop Apuron is the CEO of every Catholic institution, and what he wants, goes. And for years now we have seen what he wants. He wants the people of Guam to submit their money, their faith, and their very selves to the same neocatechumenal masters he himself has sold his soul to. 

So this is not an FD thing. It is not a scholarship thing. It is not a money thing. It is not even a (name of the person) thing. It is an Apuron thing. A Pius thing. A Gennarini thing. A Kiko thing. In other words, it's the same old thing. 

It's been going on for 20 years. It should be no surprise that our schools have also been exploited by "the thing." 

May 13, 1981
I never took Mr. Welk up on his invitation to visit him at his home. I was too in awe to do so. But I did fulfill the conditions of the scholarship, graduating with a music degree, and gave my final senior piano recital on May 13, 1981. 

I remember it well. It was the day John Paul II was shot.









26 comments:

  1. The only school not considered a Diocesan school is Notre Dame High school if I am not mistaken. The school was initially built for a convent and predatory school for those interested in becoming SSND. I believe it was funded through the Motherhouse in Wisconsin. Then you can check the School Sisters of Notre Dame for clarification on this.

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    1. Did you mean to say preparatory? Would hate to think that ND was turning out predators.

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    2. But in the final analysis, any and all Catholic entities in Guam are under the control and purview of the ordinary. Thus, even NDHS has to listen to him if they wish to continue to operate in Guam as a Catholic school or any other Catholic operation.

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    3. I agree with you Tim. This is not an FD thing or Scholarship thing. It is an Apuron thing, because none of this would have mattered if the RMS and the Neo were not involved. It seems that there are two Catholic communities in Guam, the Neo and Non Neo and pity the person who is a Non Neo.

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    4. Tim, if you look at all the NCW parishes, you find the same situation. All the NCW groups are free to do what they want with impunity but woe to those who are not a member of the NCW.

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    5. Is Jacqueline Terlaje (attorney) still the board chairperson for ND ? If she is then the Neo influence is surely present there. ND appears Neo friendly as Neo presbyters were hearing confessions and saying mass there.

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  2. The noes are not Catholic!

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  3. Neos, noes, what's the difference? They're all known as Kikolics!

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    1. I bet you can't even see the difference until told.

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    2. 11:23 PM, are you going to tell us the difference? LOL You Neos have been conditioned to believe what you're told by your neo masters without ever questioning and using your brains. The saying "Use it or lose it" holds true in many cases, and in your case you've lost the use of your brains because your superiors do the thinking for you. Jajajajajaja!

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    3. @ 11:23, We can see the difference because they're usually this large group of new faces sitting together in church on Sunday.

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    4. @ 11:23, Anyone can tell the difference because they're usually the large group of new faces sitting together in church on Sunday.

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  4. After the past two years of this whole fiasco, I think I may have a little understanding of why Rome is moving slow on the issues with the neo. I was talking with a friend recently whose sister is heavily involved in the neo as a responsible. She says her father (mother is deceased) is totally against it but cannot rock the boat for fear of losing her and the grandchildren altogether. Any questioning is seen as a slight and even persecution. Her family is divided and walks on egg shells because it is like a time bomb. They still love their family member so much :'-( It's just a sensitive issue. Honestly after hearing post after post about the Kiko's, it seems like this is a group mentality.

    Is it right to assume that Rome is moving slowly for fear that any corrections will be seen by the neo as hostile? Like my friends father, is Rome afraid to loose these people forever? Is Rome fearful that they will start their own religion? I truly believe they are already a separate church.

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    1. It doesn't make sense to keep rotten fruits together with good fruits. Cut them loose before they infect the rest! The NCW boasts they have at least a million members worldwide. They are already lost as many of their beliefs and practices are not that of the Catholic Church. Theirs is the Kiko version which is false Catholicism.

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    2. But is it right for Rome to sacrifice the spiritual well-being of us non-NCWs for the sake of these heretics? Are the NCWs entitled to yet another special privilege?

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    3. What is the real reason they don't want them apart of the NCW?

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    4. Rome, for the most part was never known to act swiftly. Look at the way the sex abuse scandals were handled and in many cases mishandled. One of the reasons this happened is that Vatican never had sound and workable policies and protocals to deal with situations such as this. Dealing with major issues threatening the Church is an area where the Vatcan falls short especially when the threats are from within. Pope Francis has a lot on his plate. Let's pray for him, that under his leadership the Catholic Church may become pleasing in the eyes of God. Holy Spirit inspire and guide us. St. Michael protect us in battle.

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  5. In my own personal anaysis, Rome is slow to act because it has been part of the problem - it failed to act quickly and definitively years ago which has allowed the NCW to proliferate around the world. Swift and decisive action now would alienate millions of neos world-wide and the ruin of souls would be, at least in part, theirs to blame. It's not the membership statistics they care about, it's more about finding a pragmatic solution that both denounces the heretical practices of the neo while transitioning its members back to the true Church. This is why Kiko has seemingly grown impatient and why his catechists so feverishly work to build their community's co-dependency. They see the writing on Rome's wall and are trying hard to build that brand loyalty they need to sustain their empire during this transition. This is what happens when you mix the politics of man into the hierarchy of the Church. I pray that our present pope has more to offer than just leading by example. I pray he has the fortitude to reform the Vatican from within and quash those clergy who aspire to positions of prominence and power like Apuron. After all, Christ only called the most unlikely of men to be his apostles, none of whom really ever wanted the job to begin with.

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  6. Tim, to be fair, unless you have other information to the contrary, we don't know what transpired between the student and Apuron. For all we know, Apuron could have told him not to worry about about paying the tuition and that he would take care of it. It would not be unreasonable to assume that if the Archibishop said it was okay, it must be okay. He is the corporation sole, is he not? I may be wrong, but this is nothing new - when FD housed seminarians of their own, wasn't their tuition also subsidized or waived?

    What really bothers me is how Apuron was able to recruit a seminarian from FD. Are there neo head hunters roaming those halls or was this a complete coincidence? I am an alumnus and soon my son will be as well. I have two others waiting for their turn but this tradition will not pass to them if my alma mater is going to become Apuron's private breeding ground for neo seminarians.

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    1. I do have other information. After the person in question quit his scholarship obligation making his tuition immediately due and payable, the report I have says that he and his family was approached on more than one occasion and told of his obligation. One of the persons who met with him &/or his family was from the group that had initially directed the granting of the scholarship. On all occasions there was no response. If the Archbishop had advised that he would pay the tuition then that was all that needed to be said. But nothing was said.

      In fact, the Archbishop may very well have paid the tuition and ordered the family to keep silent about it. If that was the case, then why? Well who else would the Archbishop pay the tuition for? If this is how it happened then it was another cover up for his neo preference.

      The sad part is that the Archbishop did not object to his going into the seminary while still in high school. The idea of a minor seminary (high school) went away awhile ago and for good reason. But Apuron just needs numbers.

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  7. Since I started following this whole mess, I came to my personal conclusion (feel free to make your own) that there is essentially nothing irreversible wrong with the individual members of the Neo. Some of them are really good folks; they just got roped in, indoctrinated, and cannot now extricate themselves. It's the organisation -- Kiko, their prophet and God; generals like the Generini's; dictators, like Pius; puppets like Apuron; and blind and indoctrinated followers - that is the problem. Their modus operandi: lie, cheat, steal! Hang in there, you good Neos; deliverance is near! And when the house of cards begins to fall - don't forget: we will still be there for you! You are NOT the enemy. And to the rest of you non-so-good Neos, go ahead and do your thing - but please NIMBY (not within our Catholic Church). Call yourselves something else, but don't call yourselves Catholics - you are not!!

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    1. The sad and tragic part with good people who join up with the NCW is that they are being ruined instead of getting closer to God like they had hoped. This is the true tragedy the NCW brings upon those who join them. Never mind the money, property, and other worldly goods. The Catholic Church was founded by Jesus Christ who we seek to re-unite with in heaven. That's it, nothing more! The politics that go on in the Vatican and within the Church worldwide are man made. Those who seek to change the Church by deviating from Her true teachings are false Catholics, as in the case of the NCW! 'Nuff said.

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    2. You have to remember that there is a personal responsibility on each person's part to form and inform their conscience as to what the truth is. They have free choice to be or not to be in the NCW, however like most testimonies, It was probably the NCW that came to their aid at the time of their need or low point in life. These (NCW) go after the valunerable and we can see how one can easily be drawn into following a group who they perceive is looking out for their welfare.

      The one point to consider however is when it comes to one's eternal destiny, we should never rely just on what other people did for us, or promised us, we should exert all our efforts in this life to seek God who is the only sure way of Salvation through the Church that he founded to be the instrument of salvation on earth.

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  8. Well said, Anonymous@10:38 p.m.

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  9. Here is a question not only about Ashton, but any too young guy going to Rms from high school... Where did je go for undergraduate degree. See what a real mess this "education" is????

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