Saturday, February 15, 2014

KIKO VS NATURAL RELIGIOUSITY

by Chuck White

I’d like to give you some questions to ask the catechists if you find yourself in the third night of the initial catechesis of the Neocatechumenal Way.  On that night, the presentation will probably, at some point, turn to the topic of “Natural Religiosity” and “Adult Faith.”

14 comments:

  1. Wasn't this 13 volume of Kiko's approved by the Vatican?

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    1. The volumes that were approved by the Vatican were approved in 2011, and, sadly, were not made available to the public. The volume to which this entry refers was revised in 1999 and was made available by Hope Publishing.

      Because we have much evidence that what the Vatican wants is disregarded by Kiko if it is not what he wants, we have no reason to believe that the Catechetical volumes in use now by the NCW are those approved by the Vatican, which include more than 20,000 corrections and indexes to the Catechism.

      The NCW is welcome to show us their approved volume from 2011 and if it contains this teaching as posted then we will gladly acknowledge that the Vatican has approved Kiko's unique condemnation of natural religiosity. Otherwise we must assume, especially given how Kiko treated the instruction on the distribution of Holy Communion and his insistence on celebrating the Eucharist outside a church, that the Vatican approval was just another disregarded letter.

      http://www.hope-pub.com/proddetail.php?prod=978-1-932717-27-3

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  2. The Neo Statutes are easy to find online, but why can't I find their teachings online too? Are they trying to keep them secret?

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  3. Vatican approval? Take the case of the Legion of Christ, one of Pope John Paul II's favorite new groups. They enjoyed FULL approval. Then Rome started to take the complaints seriously, and looked under the hood a bit more closely. Google "Fr. Marcial Maciel", or "Legion of Christ". The Church is still dealing with the fallout.

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  4. The catechism booklets are no longer available to be purchased by anyone. The books are strictly ordered for their catechists and no one else. Makes you wonder eh?

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    1. Cap'n, Cap'n, the hull's been breached!

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  5. I’ve seen the fruitfulness of lay ecclesial movements throughout my ministry as a bishop. I also served for many years in Rapid City and Denver. These are big dioceses with few priests, and working closely with laypeople is essential. Even in Philadelphia, where we have a large and wonderful presbyterate, the Church needs more lay leadership. One of the passions of Pope Francis is evangelization. In today’s world that requires a committed, faithful laity. So I think I share his concern in encouraging lay men and women to see themselves in a new way – not as passive consumers of the Gospel, but as active agents

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    1. Very true, as long as they conform to the precepts of Faith and the Magisterium of the Church.

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    2. Then please clarify whats the difference between a Protestant and Kiko's presbyter if they both dont follow the Magisterium........that's what I thought...Nothing

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    3. Anonymous (February 15, 2014 at 2:33 PM): You commented "I've seen the fruitfulness of lay ecclesial movements throughout my ministry as a bishop."

      REALLY?

      Are you actually a bishop? If you are — which I seriously doubt — it would give you more credibility if you identified yourself.

      OR

      Are you posting a quotation from a real bishop? If so, please cite your source instead of trying to impersonate a bishop.

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    4. Mary Lou ...the quote says Bishop of Rapid City And Denver. that is Archbishop Chaput.

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    5. Anonymous (February 18, 2014 at 1:08 AM): You are absolutely right in referring to the comment by Anonymous (February 15, 2014 at 2:33 PM) as a QUOTE, even though it does not include the words “Bishop OF Rapid City and Denver” as you did in your response.

      Please note that the QUOTE actually says “ … bishop. … IN Rapid City and Denver …” It is also written using the word “I” which is Singular, First Person, Nominative Personal Pronoun. The use of that particular pronoun usually means that the person is writing about him/herself. Since the commenter posted without using the appropriate punctuation marks to indicate he/she is quoting Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, it appears as though he/she appropriated the words of the Archbishop in an effort to post it as his/her original thought.

      It is important to give credit where credit is due. A simple citation — for example, “As Archbishop Charles J. Chaput stated during a recent interview … [followed by the above quotation] …” — would have sufficed.

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  6. Excellent blog. The other blog about presbyters and the kiko belief on the Holy Euchcarist has shed much light on this group. Unfortunately, I'm afraid if I ask these questions that Mr. White proposes, I will be asked to leave the catechesis. I think all this exposure has left them feeling naked and it's been pretty chilly lately. I appreciate the truth.

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  7. Excellent article, Chuck. One of the things that I've always appreciated about the Church is it's honesty about the interaction between the spiritual and physical, that although we are guided by the holy spirit, we are nonetheless a physical, man-made institution that attempts to bridge -- with inherently limited success -- the chasm between the physical and spiritual not just through prayer and oblation but by dividing sacred space from profane. I also appreciate the ecumenism that this gives rise to. Other religious traditions are not condemned as inherently wrong, but rather viewed as properly inclined toward the divine but simply lacking in knowledge of the truth granted to Christians. In the NCW, I see just another movement that cannot come to grips with the physicality and temporality of the Church. In this, the NCW is very similar to the Gnostics and various of the Protestant sects and, in particular, the "primitive church" Protestants. Most striking is their shared pretense about the early Church as a Halcion time where the faith was shared and practiced without imposition of dogma from a clerical hierarchy and without liturgical structure. There was a time when the Protestants could invoke this "early church" in support of almost any new contrivance; however, with so much of the early works translated into English it doesn't take much effort to see that no such "early church" ever existed. Members of the NCW need to ask their leaders to point to the early church sources that supposedly support the NCW's practices. I think their requests will be met with silence or unsatisfying vagaries.

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