Friday, June 20, 2014

IT IS TIME FOR FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY

The Archdiocesan Annual Appeal only reached 42% of the goal set by Archbishop Apuron. Here's some advice for next time:

Achieving Financial Transparency for Dioceses

Whitepaper Overview

For all organizations in the nonprofit sector, financial transparency is synonymous with survival. Dependence on donors necessitates an ongoing demonstration of where money is spent and how funded activities and programs fulfill defined mission statements. While Catholic dioceses are not required by law to be transparent and accountable, there is a definite shift towards the production of financial reports that provide a complete picture of the financial health of the entire diocese from the bishop’s and archbishop’s office down to the parishioner donor level.

Internal Financial Controls in the U.S. Catholic Church


One of the by-products of the recent U.S. Catholic Church clergy sexual abuse scandal  was a new focus on the Church's financial transparency and accountability. As the  scandal unfolded, parishioners learned that in some dioceses, payments related to the  scandal had been taking place for years. Some of the payments went to victims in the  form of settlements or to pay for counseling; some went to pay for the "rehabilitation" of  priests accused of pedophile; and some funds were paid out in lawyers fees. The vast  majority of Catholics was unaware of these payments, and therefore surprised by the magnitude of the scandal.

Read more

CLICK HERE FOR A COPY OF HOW THE ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO DOES IT. 

17 comments:

  1. Wow! They didn't even reach their half way mark! The Gala funding should cover it!

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    1. So do tell, how was the GALA? Never heard a word about it.

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    2. Don't know! Was looking for a write up and pictures afterwards in the Umatuna! Nada! Walla'! Nothing! Taya'!

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    3. On purpose no coverage. Keeping low profile for Neo after Tagle fiasco. Don't worry, they'll be back hogging the paper soon.

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  2. Man don't live in bread alone.

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    Replies
    1. Are you in remedial English 101 at the Seminary? Just wondering.

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    2. Catholics UnitedJune 22, 2014 at 6:52 AM

      per a seminarian last night, nearly all of them failed their final exam on History of the Church this month

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    3. Grades curved! Can't disappoint Rome! Gotta have the Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude and Cum Laude!

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    4. Was this History test given as an ESL exam, GED exam? And they still flunked! What a shame!!!!

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    5. Anon 9:25 do you have proof the grade was curve or just a feed off the Rohr congregation? Hmmmmmm. Show some evidence.

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    6. Feel free to show us evidence of their course of studies, teachers, credit hours, etc. Meanwhile, the evidence of the curved grades is in the inability of these poor men to function in a parish. The sad thing it is not their fault, most of them. They are being cheated and used.

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    7. When the grades have to be scaled, the fault is with the construct of the exam. Should have been multiple choice. With only one choice. There you are magna cum laude.

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    8. Any institution of higher learning publishes course requirements and electives. What's the big secret? Huh? Cough Them up. We have a right to know. We are all benefactors.

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    9. 1:50 PM. That is a good one! They should take your advice!

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  3. Most of that history wasn't real catholic. All that is important is AK history. After Kiko. The reformer of the Church to its authentic practices. Per one teacher. Seminarians sleep, fool around, don't do assignments. Junior high school Seminary. Rector Michael has a tutor. Very nice lady.

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  4. Who is rector Michael? Was he promoted? Who did he replace? Ai da kine betta no sit comfortably,eh!

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    Replies
    1. Whoops Vice Rector.

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