Sunday, May 15, 2016

KIKO'S KLEROMANCY: THE MERKABA

Posted by Chuck White

A significant cause for the troubles which Guam experiences with its Neocatechumenal seminarians and missionaries is the method of discernment, or I should say, the method of divination, used to determine the destination of these seminarians and missionary families...Read more.

10 comments:

  1. Dead Chuck, do not forget that during Kiko's convivence with the Rabbinis, all neocatehumenals danced around the fire to celebrate Lag Ba'Omer and Zohar founder Rabbi Akiva.

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  2. Get ready for EXCOMMUNICATION is coming your way. Suing you is light, putting your name in the Vatican would be forever.

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    1. And I'd take it all the way to the Roman Rota, oh brave Anonymous @5:55 p.m., you can be sure of that.

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    2. Ah! the famous excommunication!
      We had not heard that one in a couple of years.
      This was the main threat a year in this story.
      Interesting timing!!

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    3. @ Chuck suit yourself...you had a chance, pray for a contrite heart. It's time for you. Your asking for it.

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  3. @ Chuck White
    Don't forget to send to the competent canonic tribunal, as a proof of catholic practices of the Way, a copy of the book "The mud and the secret". If it is not available in Guam , I can personally bring it to the Sacra Rota.
    Lino

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  4. Thank you, Lino! We do have a few copies of your book that are being put to good use, as you can see from the post.

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  5. Chuck, I infer from your posting that you believe that Fr. Luis Camacho was assigned to Guam by way of the ritual lottery method (merkaba). If you did not intend this inference, then please correct me.
    Fr. L. Camacho is by far and away the seminarian (turned priest) that seems to have caused most embarrassment (or trouble) on Guam for both the local church and the NCW. If Fr. L. Camacho was assigned to Guam as a NCW missionary based on divination, then the divination did not mismatch him with Guam in terms of language or culture (because he shares these with Guam). His challenge to himself and to his vocation lies elsewhere; and, as you suggest, lack of a longer period of scrutiny and discernment could very well lie at the basis of this challenge.
    There may be or have been other seminarians who became priests on Guam who have had difficulty in terms of both language and culture, but one need not infer from this circumstance a mischance of the merkaba. It is rather common for missionaries not to have 100% command of the local culture and language when they come to work at a mission site. Such knowledge can take years to acquire, and missteps due to this lack of knowledge can give rise to troubles within the community. I know this from experience because I have lived in mission church parishes for many years in both Africa (Namibia) and Asia (Okinawa).

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    1. Timothy, the number or Chamorro seminarians at the RMS has been large enough to assume that some exceptions are sometimes made to the Merkaba. Faiola, Bushu and da Silva Oliveira, would be examples, in my opinion, of the pitfalls of the Merkaba. But I get your point: the Merkaba is not the only cause of the problems.

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